An unofficial fan forum for Dave Hause
 
HomePortalRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 Devour - Background

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
enola
Vampire Squid
Vampire Squid
avatar

Posts : 427
Join date : 2013-07-31
Location : Vienna, Austria

PostSubject: Devour - Background   01.10.13 20:47

I found this very moving ....

Dave Hause had it all figured out by his late 20s: he was the singer in a successful punk band, the Loved Ones; ran his own construction business in Philadelphia when he wasn’t touring; and was happily married. Then it all fell apart: the band petered out, construction work dried up when the economy tanked in 2009 and he and his wife split up — a string of events that laid the foundation for his new solo album “Devour,” premiering today on Speakeasy.

It’s an album divided into thirds as Hause, 35, reflects on his origins growing up in an evangelical Christian household in working-class Philadelphia, how that informs his present circumstances and what may come in the future.

“For me, in my 20s, I was just ripping through. I just had this insatiable appetite: Be in a band, get married, have a construction business, try to build your little corner of the world, whatever that is,” Hause told Speakeasy. “And the whole time you’re partying and acting like a kid and you wake up years later and wonder how a lot of that stuff caved in and a lot of that stuff didn’t work out the way I’d hoped. And you have to figure out what the rest of your life is going to look like, because it does feel like a halfway point. That’s where a lot of this came from: Trying to figure out how I got wired this way, what it means to me now and trying to figure out some kind of hope for the future.”

________________________
Manuela
twitter / instagram / youtube / last.fm / record collection

Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.
Soren Kierkegaard
Back to top Go down
These Melodies
Fighting Back
Fighting Back


Posts : 267
Join date : 2013-08-03
Age : 34
Location : Bonn, Germany

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   02.10.13 20:10

it is!!!!
Now it makes even more sense, that he said that he owns his life to Chuck!
At least I guess that is the "background story" to it.
Back to top Go down
StitchesOnTheRadio
Fighting Back
Fighting Back
avatar

Posts : 177
Join date : 2013-08-03
Age : 26
Location : New York, NY

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   02.10.13 21:32

When did he say he owes his life to Chuck? I must've missed that one.
Back to top Go down
enola
Vampire Squid
Vampire Squid
avatar

Posts : 427
Join date : 2013-07-31
Location : Vienna, Austria

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   02.10.13 21:53

StitchesOnTheRadio wrote:
When did he say he owes his life to Chuck? I must've missed that one.
I remember he said that during the EU revival a few times ...

________________________
Manuela
twitter / instagram / youtube / last.fm / record collection

Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.
Soren Kierkegaard
Back to top Go down
These Melodies
Fighting Back
Fighting Back


Posts : 267
Join date : 2013-08-03
Age : 34
Location : Bonn, Germany

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   03.10.13 12:23

I've heard it here (unfortunately I wasn't there, just found the videos on youtube...):


And he thanked Chuck on every gig I've seen him so far.
Back to top Go down
StitchesOnTheRadio
Fighting Back
Fighting Back
avatar

Posts : 177
Join date : 2013-08-03
Age : 26
Location : New York, NY

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   04.10.13 6:56

Jeez Dave, heavy comment to make before breaking into a song. Thanks for finding a clip!
Back to top Go down
enola
Vampire Squid
Vampire Squid
avatar

Posts : 427
Join date : 2013-07-31
Location : Vienna, Austria

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   04.10.13 15:40

Great article about Devour! There's so much interesting info in there - a must read.

http://thekey.xpn.org/2013/10/03/deconstructing-the-american-dream-with-phillys-dave-hause-playing-free-at-noon-tomorrow/

Deconstructing the American dream with Philly’s Dave Hause (playing Free at Noon tomorrow)

“I promised that this wouldn’t happen to me”

A bound and hooded Peregrine falcon perches atop its owner’s leather glove on the cover of Devour (Rise Records), Dave Hause’s second solo LP. The captor’s face, in a soft focus, gazes listlessly into the distance.

“They’re the fastest predators in the world,” Hause explains. “They can fly up to 240 miles per hour. It’s something you need to physically put a blindfold on and keep chained to your wrist. It has this endless, carnivorous intent that’s makes up a lot of the theme of the record.”

It’s also a pretty apt visual for what was originally intended as the third and long-awaited record from The Loved Ones, the Hause-fronted Philly punk band that has been keeping things quiet since he began cementing his solo career with his first full-length, 2011’s Resolutions (Paper + Plastick). About a third of the songs on Devour were written in between the release of the last Loved Ones record, Build & Burn (Fat Wreck Chords), and Resolutions. But before the Loved Ones were set to map out a grander, more concept-heavy record that would have been titled The Great Depression – and as Hause started to realize his potential as a solo artist – he had to stop and take some time to think for a second. “Everybody was a little ambivalent about touring, we had lost a little bit of momentum and I had gained a ton as a solo guy,” he says. “I wanted to be able to deliver the songs in various ways; live, recording them differently and not relying on a band format.” Smoldering, those songs eventually became Devour.

And what about those songs? The end result is, to be frank, a highly realized piece of songwriting, both musically and thematically, that nearly abandons Hause’s punk roots for dirt-caked, teeth-grinding heartland rock. Well-tested pop punk hooks still backbone tracks, like lead single “We Could Be Kings,” but classically American melodies, twinkling keys (played by My Morning Jacket’s Bo Koster) and Hause’s wounded vocal assure that this is something else entirely- less Loved Ones and more along the lines of Bruce Springsteen’s Darkness on the Edge of Town or Wrecking Ball.

But above all, Devour is a record for lyric nerds. Through 12 tracks, Hause creates a loose narrative arc, bookended by opening and closing tracks that address the listener directly. And between those, motifs of financial asphyxiation, binge consumption, addiction and religious guilt compose a Recession-era, three-act study on the modern American condition that would make a college English professor proud. “What I wanted to examine was where I came from,” Hause says. “How did I grow up and how did we get into this situation? We realize that most of the promises we were made as kids didn’t quite work out.”

“I know that it ripped you apart
They told us we could be kings
When we were damned from the start”

Born and raised in Roxborough, Hause’s upbringing in a working class neighborhood with his dad and three sisters informed the bulk of Devour’s thesis of calculated disappointment. “The Great Depression” lays it all out: “We were the Reagan kids/ Our heroes didn’t work like our daddies did,” Hause, behind a lone guitar track, declares of playing all the games right as a child – earn good grades, go to church, etc. – that should secure financial and social stability, before later resigning, “If you wanted us safe why would you fuck with our heads?” Expectation loses sorely to reality as Hause wrestles with that frustration of being told, “No. What you we were taught as kids is all fantasy. Poor folks stay poor. Upward mobility isn’t real.”

So is the American Dream dead, then?

Hause sighs.

“You know, I really hope not,” he says, “but I do think that there’s a pretty big chasm between what was available to a working class family in the eighties and what actually came about in the late 2000’s.” Adulthood and entering his 30’s put things in greater perspective for him. “It’s really frustrating as an adult to come to grips with that, where you have to work two or three times as hard just to keep up and hope you’re in a decent enough neighborhood where the school system isn’t awful.” With all of this in mind, Hause still wouldn’t classify Devour as a strictly political record. “It’s like saying, ‘Hey, this is what you guys all promised us and this is what’s really happening.’ It’s more of a personal reflection of how politics affect regular people. It’s loaded. It’s in there.”

“I think she might’ve loved me ‘cause it made her sad
You can get pretty good at feeling pretty bad”

That “go to church” sentiment looms pretty heavy as well. While he’s not religious these days, Christian imagery is woven throughout Devour, which, according to Hause, which, according to Hause, again reminds us of broken promises. “You believe in this god, you’ll go to heaven. If you go to this school, you’ll become successful. If you abide by these morals and you get married, you’ll be happy. All of that, when you flash forward 20 years and see what it really looks like, it isn’t always true.”

Hause’s divine anxiety carries through as Devour narrows its focus from wide societal issues to his personal relationships. “I wanted to take a look at those things and get specific about how that affects the person that I am. The middle third of the record, songs like “Before,” “Father’s Son” and “Becoming Secular” apply to where I’m at now to the overall arc of the record,” he says. “I would kneel down low / under stained glass light / to taste your body, to taste your blood / then count the minute ‘til we’d reunite,” he croons on the disco ball lit, slow dance “Before”, carrying that theme of hunger and desire from a macro to micro level of physical want.

It cumulates into a larger cycle of American desire. Whether it’s an addiction to staring at cell phone screens, to a higher income, or to an ex-lover, Devour addresses this trapped way of life. But how do we break free from that? What’s the remedy?

“We don’t stutter when we sing
Our melodies grow little wings”

There’s uplift towards the last few tracks on the pretty damn bleak Devour. It begins bubbling toward the surface at the end of “Becoming Secular,” when Hause confesses: “I lost faith but I’m trying to believe.” That’s better than giving up. “That final third is the lift. That’s, “Where are we going to go from here?” The intention is to say, “Well, here’s where we’re going to go.” That’s the hope, the silver lining of the record.” It manifests most clearly on “The Shine,” a song Hause has been playing live for a few years now. A pretty ambiguous term, Hause explains:

“My friend Kate, who manages the Bouncing Souls, she’s always been saying, ‘Listen. You’ve got the Shine, so you need to go out and shine.’ It was this encouraging thing she would say whenever times were rough or my confidence was low so I was trying to use that thing she did for me and put it in a song to hopefully do the same for other people.”

It’s Hause’s way of saying that this voracious cycle of American hunger can be torn away from. A liberating notion, for sure, which he alludes back to the Peregrine falcon that represents this collection of songs and the story it tells. “There’s that little hint of the outside world in the cover too, behind the curtains,” he says.

“To put the falcon in a domestic setting, you can’t ever quite tame that.”

________________________
Manuela
twitter / instagram / youtube / last.fm / record collection

Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.
Soren Kierkegaard


Last edited by enola on 13.10.13 11:33; edited 2 times in total
Back to top Go down
enola
Vampire Squid
Vampire Squid
avatar

Posts : 427
Join date : 2013-07-31
Location : Vienna, Austria

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   04.10.13 22:45

Another article

http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20131004_Dave_Hause_takes_a_big_step_with_new_solo_record.html

Dave Hause takes a big step with new solo record

Dave Hause , known for his work with the Loved Ones, has several area shows set as his new album, Devour is out Tuesday

Dave Hause made his name with the Loved Ones, the Philadelphia punk-rock band that released two albums, Keep Your Heart and Build & Burn, in the '00s, and he put out an album, Resolutions, under his name (which rhymes with "Dawes") in 2011.

But the 35-year-old songwriter's solo career really begins in earnest with his bold new coming-of-age (and losing-of-innocence) album, Devour, to be released Tuesday. That same day, Hause, who will perform a WXPN Free at Noon show at World Cafe Live today, is slated to play two sold-out shows at the side chapel at the First Unitarian Church.

"These songs are tracing where I came from, what it was like for me and my friends to grow up," Hause said on the phone this week from Santa Barbara, Calif., where he settled after recording Devour at L.A.'s fabled Grandmaster studios. "Working-class, Philadelphian, religious - but with this crazy American ambition as well, this appetite that's hardwired into us as Americans."

Hause was raised in Roxborough with a strict religious upbringing. He graduated high school from Phil-Mont Christian Academy in Erdenheim, where he was not permitted to wear his Metallica T-shirt to school.

"It was a crazy way to grow up for somebody who was basically worshiping at the altar of rock and roll. I butted heads with the powers that be throughout my school career," he says with a laugh. "They steeled our resolve though negative reinforcement."

In 1986, Hause became a fan of the Hooters. "They looked cool to an 8-year-old," he recalls. "I liked the records my dad had around the house. Dire Straits, the Beatles, Springsteen. But they were my first band."

From there, Hause got into punk and hard rock and metal, and became a regular at his favorite record store, Main Street Music in Manayunk. Store owner Pat Feeney "had this big effect on me as a teenager. I'd roll in there with lawn-mowing money and ask him for an Exodus record, and he'd say, 'Why don't you try the Replacements?' " Hause will return the favor when he does an in-store performance at the shop Oct. 12.

Over time with the Loved Ones, Hause's frustration grew with the self-imposed limitations of the closed ecosystem of latter-day punk. "I was spending so much time on the lyrics and holding them up to my favorite songwriters, whether it's Patty Griffin or Conor Oberst," he says. "And I felt like it was getting lost in the sauce."

Before he tested the solo waters with Resolutions, he had already written the first four songs on Devour, originally intending them for a Loved Ones record. He tried out the ambitious, forthright material on a 2011 solo tour with Chuck Ragan of Hot Water Music, Dan Andriano of Alkaline Trio, and Brian Fallon of Gaslight Anthem. His fellow musicians "all separately pulled me aside and said: 'You've really got something going here. You're running lean and mean. You need to see it through.' "

Songs like "The Great Depression" and "Autism Vaccine Blues" were written around 2009, as Hause's construction business fell apart, with his marriage soon to follow. Subsequent songs such as "Same Disease" and "Father's Son" had an even darker hue. So he was pleased when he came up with "The Shine," the album's hortatory two-part single that strikes an uplifting chord amid Leonard Cohen references.

"It was dark, and I felt really good about the material and that it was strong," Hause says of the album. "But the one thing I didn't want was to put out a Downward Spiral or an In Utero in terms of tone. There's a glimmer of hope there."

________________________
Manuela
twitter / instagram / youtube / last.fm / record collection

Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.
Soren Kierkegaard
Back to top Go down
misscor
First Cut
First Cut
avatar

Posts : 22
Join date : 2013-08-18

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   10.10.13 1:53

He said a similar thing when he was out here in Australia with Gaslight this year, talking about the tour in 2010 with HWM and Bouncing Souls and how they helped him (and their music) get through the dark time in his life and he is forever greatful and then dedicated 'The Shine' to them at all the shows.
Back to top Go down
enola
Vampire Squid
Vampire Squid
avatar

Posts : 427
Join date : 2013-07-31
Location : Vienna, Austria

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   13.10.13 11:28

Very interesting interview although only in German. I will try to get the original english text and if that fails I will translate it ...

http://www.tinnitusattacks.com/2013/10/fur-mich-ist-musik-erlosung-dave-hause.html

"Für mich ist Musik Erlösung": Dave Hause im Interview
Dave Hause ist einer der Gesprächspartner, die einen aufs Neue entdecken lassen, warum man das alles macht. Warum sich an der Wohnzimmerwand eben die Platten auftürmen und man nicht, sagen wir, Auto-Tuning als Hobby hat. Im Interview mit Daniel Drescher von Tinnitus Attacks spricht er über das Ende seiner Punkrockband The Loved Ones, sein neues Soloalbum „Devour“, das am 11. Oktober erschienen ist - und Literaturtipps für die Zeit auf Tour.

Dave, wie und wann sind die Songs entstanden? Warum hat Du sie als Soloplatte veröffentlicht?

Ich hatte die Hälfte dieser Songs schon, bevor ich meine erste Soloplatte „Resolutions“ gemacht habe. Eigentlich hätten die Stücke
das dritte Loved Ones-Album ergeben sollen. Ich legte sie zur Seite. Als ich dann mit „Resolutions“ getourt bin und viele gute Reaktionen darauf bekommen habe, hat mich das beflügelt. Da fand ich es sinnvoller, die Songs auf ein neues Soloalbum zu packen. Bis ich das Album zu Ende geschrieben hatte, dauerte es ein paar Jahre, aber ich bin froh, dass ich die Zeit hatte. Mir war wichtig, einen hoffnungsvollen Ton anzuschlagen. Die erste Hälfte ist inhaltlich sehr schwer. Im zweiten Teil der Platte will ich den Höher emporheben.

Heißt das denn auch, dass The Loved Ones endgültig abgehakt sind? Oder wird es in Zukunft noch Alben mit der Band geben?

Ich bezweifle, dass wir nochmal was machen. Ganz ausschließen würde ich es nicht, wir sind Freunde und hatten viel Spaß zusammen. Aber wir sind alle mit anderen Dingen beschäftigt. Nach der zweiten Platte machten wir eine Pause, ich nahm mein Solodebüt auf. Das ist viel einfacher, es funktioniert besser. Festivalauftritte oder Benefiz-Konzerte oder sowas, das könnte schon sein, aber kein Album. Mir gefällt besser, was ich jetzt solo mache.

Gibt es auf „Devour“ einen Song, auf den du besonders stolz bist?

In der ersten Hälfte des Albums: „The Great Depression“. Ich hab versucht, einen Song darüber zu schreiben, wie ich in den 80ern in einem Arbeiterklasse-Milieu aufgewachsen bin, mit meiner Familie, Freunde, Cousins. Es geht auch ums Älterwerden und wie sich Versprechungen, die man Dir als Kind gemacht hat, sich entwickeln. Dieser Song bedeutet mir viel. Und dann „Fathers Son“. In der Mitte der Platte fängt man an zu sehen, wie der Hunger sich auf das Leben auswirken kann. Wie schädlich er sich auf die Fähigkeit zu lieben auswirkt, auf ein soziales Miteinander. Ab „The Shine“ gibt einem die Platte dann Hoffnung und etwas Positives. Etwas zum Festhalten. Es ist wichtig, dass man kreativ ist und etwas tut, damit man auf gute Weise durch die Dunkelheit in dieser Welt kommt. Mit diesen drei Songs bin ich sehr glücklich, ich bin stolz auf die Texte.

Kannst Du mir etwas darüber erzählen, wie Du im Arbeitermilieu aufgewachsen bist und wie Dich das geprägt hat?

Bei mir und vielen meiner Freunde war es so, dass ein Elternteil gearbeitet hat. Dabei haben sie genug verdient, um die Familie zu ernähren und ein maßvolles, anständiges Haus in einem guten Viertel zu bauen. Das Schulsystem war noch nicht komplett verschlossen, es gab Hoffnung auf sozialen Aufstieg: Wenn Du hart arbeitest, kannst Du ein gutes Leben führen, wenn auch mit beschränkten Mitteln. Inzwischen ist es aber so: Beide Eltern müssen extrem hart arbeiten, um ihren Kindern eine gute Umgebung und eine gute Schule zu ermöglichen – nichts Übertriebenes, sondern mit Einschränkungen verbunden. Es ist sehr schwierig geworden. Gerade mal 20 Jahre später. Und das ist auch Teil dieses trügerischen amerikanischen Traums, der verdunstet ist. In religiöser Hinsicht bin ich evangelikal erzogen worden. Es gab viele Ideale, die an die Kinder weitergegeben wurden. Aber während man aufwächst, merkt man, dass viel von diesem religiösen Zeug nicht wahr ist. Viele Erwartungen und Ängste, die einem übergestülpt werden, sind unnötig.

Du hast offensichtlich viel an die Wirtschaft gedacht, als Du dieses Album geschrieben hast. Ich habe das Gefühl, auch die NSA-Affäre trägt dazu bei, dass man keine Illusionen mehr über die USA hat.

Meine Platte ist ein persönlicher Blick auf all diese Dinge. Ich glaube klar an die Privatsphäre. Wenn es um Sozialpolitik geht, bin ich sehr liberal. Aber ich denke, diese Platte ist meine persönliche Antwort darauf, woher ich komme, wie ich dahin gekommen bin, wo ich stehe – und wie es weitergeht. Ja, es gibt viel Desillusion, und viel Herzeleid, viel Frustration. Und viel davon kommt daher, weil es schwierig ist, gute persönliche Beziehungen aufzubauen, wenn man diesen großen Hunger hat. Dieser Hunger wird kulturell verstärkt: Unsere Prioritäten liegen darauf, mehr zu bekommen, mehr zu tun, essen, trinken, Frauen, Geld. Am Ende ist es eine unausgewogene, haltlose Situation. Es gibt Sozialkritik in den Songs, aber letztendlich ist es eben meine persönliche Sicht. Und am Ende gibt es vielleicht Hoffnung.

Können Musiker positive Veränderungen direkt herbeiführen? Oder ist es eher ihr Beitrag, dass sie Menschen inspirieren und ermutigen, die ihrerseits etwas Gutes tun wollen?

Ich glaube schon, dass Musiker etwas bewirken können. Viele meiner Helden haben darüber geschrieben, wie sich die Welt verändern kann, wenn man sich gegenseitig mit Respekt behandelt und gemeinschaftlich denkt. Bob Marley, Joe Strummer, Ian MacKaye. Sie haben mein Denken geprägt. Kunst und Kultur halten der Gesellschaft einen Spiegel vor und lassen sie einen mit mehr Empathie und Verständnis sehen. Manchmal ist es aber auch gut, einfach nur seinen Hintern zu schütteln. Für mich ist Musik Erlösung. Ich hoffe, dass die Menschen das mitnehmen. Aber es ist auch direkter Rock, der als Soundtrack zum Autofahren funktioniert. Kreative Menschen sind das Herz der Kultur, finde ich. Es wäre schön, wenn Menschen etwas Positives davon mitnehmen und sich dadurch die Welt ein Stück zum Besseren wandelt.

Lass uns etwas über die Aufnahmen sprechen. Du hast das Album in den Grandmaster Recorder Studios aufgenommen. Hier waren schon die Foo Fighters, die Nine Inch Nails...Dein Producer Andrew Alekel hat bereits für berühmte Künstler produziert. Wie war es für Dich, dort mit ihm zu arbeiten?

Es war wirklich großartig. Eine Situation, in der ich mich sofort wohlgefühlt habe, Davor war ich sehr aufgewühlt. Ich hab Songs geschrieben, die aus schwierigen Situationen entstanden sind, hab getourt... Die Aufnahmen hätten nicht einfacher sein können. Andrew ist ein Experte. Er weiß, wie man einen Sound hinbekommt, den man will, er arbeitet sehr effizient. Er versteht den kreativen Prozess. Und jeder, der auf der Platte mitwirkt, war so großzügig mit seiner Zeit. Es war sehr einfach, sehr gute Takes in sehr kurzer Zeit hinzubekommen. Das war eine große Freude. Das Studio ist natürlich auch toll. Ein sehr schöner Ort mit holzvertäfelten Wänden... hatte etwas von einem Piratenschiff.

Du hattest Gesellschaft von Musikern, die Du vom Touren kennst. Man hängt zwischen den Shows rum, lebt im Tourbus miteinander. War es anders mit ihnen, jetzt wo Ihr gemeinsam im Studio wart?

Es war ganz anders. Manche kannte ich auch noch nicht. Andrew und Mitchell Townsend, der koproduzierte, waren bei Resolutions mit dabei. Aber Bob Thompson, den Bassisten, kannte ich noch nicht. Seine Band Big Drill Car war mir ein Begriff. Aber ich hatte noch nie mit ihm gearbeitet. Dave Hidalgo von Social Distortion kannte ich schon, und als Fan von My Morning Jacket kannte ich Bo Koster auch. Es war unglaublich, wie sie alle als Band harmoniert haben. Es war beinah unheimlich, weil ich nicht wusste, was man erwarten sollte. Nach ein paar Tagen hatten wir alles zusammen.

Frank Turner, Dallas Green und Du – Ihr hattet alle Bands und seid jetzt solo unterwegs. Man könnte meinen, die Szene werde individueller. Aber dann ist alles so familiär, mit Dir und Chuck Ragan und so. Wie nimmst Du das alles wahr?

Ich habe großes Glück, Teil dieser Gemeinschaft zu sein. Das ist sehr ermutigend und sehr familiär. Ich glaube, es ist einfach eine Frage, wie man seine Musik präsentieren will. Manchmal fehlt es mir, in einer Band zu sein. Doch je älter ich werde und je klarer meine Vorstellung wird, ist es einfacher, solo zu sein, weil man das Sagen hat. Aber es ist auch riskanter und ein bisschen unheimlich, es allein zu machen, weil man die ganze Verantwortung hat. Wenn man die Bühne betritt, und es ein paar mal funktioniert, ist es das ein Hochgefühl. Und man kann dem etwas anderes abgewinnen. Ich will schon eine Band mit einbringen, und ich will nicht immer das Gleiche machen. Deshalb waren die Loved Ones auch am Ende. Es war Routine. Ich wollte mehr Spontaneität. Ich möchte mir die Optionen offen halten. Ich meine, ich hab mit einer Band aufgenommen, auch auf Festivals muss eine Band mit auf der Bühne sein.

Ich musste unweigerlich an Bruce Springsteen denken, als ich Dein Album gehört habe. Er scheint viele zu beeinflussen, nicht nur The Hold Steady. Was macht ihn so groß?

Er ist seiner Arbeit sehr verpflichtet und seiner langfristigen Vision. Bruce schaute schon früh auf seine Karriere. Er hat so viel gute Arbeit abgeliefert. Dieser Mann ist ein Beispiel, was du machen kannst wenn Du willst. Er hat an seiner Vision festgehalten und arbeitet sehr hart. Das findet seinen Nachhall mit mir als arbeitender Musiker, der vielleicht keine Hitsingle im Radio haben wird. Zumindest noch nicht jetzt. Er zeigt, dass man eine lange Karriere und eine lange Beziehung zu seinem Publikum haben kann. Deshalb sehe ich zu ihm auf.

Brian Fallon von The Gaslight Anthem hast kürzlich über das Songwriting gesagt, in ihm sei etwas, das raus wolle. Was ist Deine Motivation beim Songs schreiben?

Jeder, der das so lange tut wie wir, hat etwas in sich, das ihn antreibt. Man kann eine Platte aufnehmen, auf Tour gehen, und es legt sich. Aber es kommt immer wieder zurück. Ob es eine existenzielle Krise ist, oder ob man die Welt aufrütteln weil, weil sie nicht so ist wie man sie sich vorstellt. Man will ein Zeichen setzen. Das treibt viele Musiker an.

Erinnerst Du Dich an Deine ersten musikalischen Schritte?

Ja, sehr deutlich. Die ersten Shows, die ich mit Bands gespielt habe, die erste Soloshow, die erste Gitarrenstunde...die erste Band, in die ich mich verliebt habe. Musik ist mein Dreh- und Angelpunkt. Manchmal kann es Chaos in Deinem Leben verursachen und Dich sehr einsam machen. Denn die Menschen, die Du liebst, sind zuhause, machen normale Sachen, feiern Geburtstage, Jahrestage, und Du bist auf Tour. Aber es ist trotzdem so ein großartiges Leben, das mir die Musik ermöglicht, dass es das wert ist.

Wie alt warst Du, als Du zum ersten Mal eine Gitarre in die Hand genommen hast?

Da war ich zwölf.

Und was war die erste Band, in die Du Dich verliebt hast?

Das war eine lokale Pop-Rock-Band namens The Hooters. Die haben diesen Song „All You Zombies“ gemacht. Das war ihr erster Hit. Die waren in Philly in den 80ern echt groß und haben die Leute begeistert. Ich war acht und fand dass sie cool aussahen, gut klangen. Ihre Musik hab ich rauf und runter gespielt. „Thriller“ von Michael Jackson hatte es mir auch angetan. Und aus irgend einem Grund fand ich Lionel Ritchie gut. Meine Eltern waren etwas schockiert wie sehr ich auf Musik stand.

Haben Dich Deine Eltern unterstützt?

Absolut. Mein Vater ist selber Gitarrist, ein großartiger Musiker. Er liebt und respektiert die Musik und hat mich immer unterstützt. Auch heute tut er das noch.

Du hast erwähnt, wie schwierig es ist, Privat- und Tourleben unter einen Hut zu bringen. Hast Du eigentlich Kinder und Familie?

Nein, nicht mehr. Ich hatte das schon mal. Es ist sehr schwierig, die richtige Balance zu finden. Mir sind viele Menschen sehr wichtig, die ich lange Zeit zuhause gelassen habe. Meine unmittelbare Familie, Nichten, Neffen. Man muss sein bestes geben, um sie alle immer wieder zu
sehen.

Hast Du eine spezielle Art, Dir auf Tour die Zeit zu vertreiben?

Ich lese gerne, verbringe aber auch gern Zeit mit Freunden. Durch das viele Touren hab ich Freunde in so vielen Städten, die ich nicht so oft sehe wie ich gern wollte, so dass ich sie dann treffe, wenn ich unterwegs bin. Ich schreibe viele Songs, aber die Pausen sind kurz. Und ich lese auch gern. Es ist eine gute Zeit, um Bücher zu lesen.

Gibt es was Essenzielles, was Du empfehlen würdest?

Wenn man Musik mag: „Waging Heavy Peace“, die Autobiografie von Neil Young. Alles von Cormac McCarthy, wenn man einen modernen amerikanischen Autor lesen will. Und ich liebe „God Delusion“ von Richard Dawkins. Ein atheistisches Manifest, das mir sehr geholfen hat, mit Angst und schuld fertigzuwerden. Den Rolling Stone lese ich gerne wegen der politischen Artikel. Sie haben den Finger am Puls der Zeit.

Kannst Du eigentlich von der Musik leben?

Ja, leben schon, aber eher ärmlich. Aber die beste Lebensweise, die ich bisher kennengelernt habe.

Was würdest Du beruflich machen, wenn Du nicht Musiker wärst?

Ich bin Zimmermann. Zu Loved-Ones-Zeiten habe ich mit einem Freund Häuser umgebaut, neue Küchen rein und so. Ich bin begabt, mach es aber nicht so gerne. Ich hab es getan, weil ich es tun musste.

________________________
Manuela
twitter / instagram / youtube / last.fm / record collection

Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.
Soren Kierkegaard


Last edited by enola on 13.10.13 11:34; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
StitchesOnTheRadio
Fighting Back
Fighting Back
avatar

Posts : 177
Join date : 2013-08-03
Age : 26
Location : New York, NY

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   14.10.13 1:08

Maybe this is my American superiority complex talking, and heck, maybe I've already complained about this in the past, but I don't understand why they don't automatically release articles like this with an English version (or a version in the language that the artist traditionally speaks) it's not like it'd be extra work because the questions were already answered in that language.

But until this changes, I appreciate the efforts that you lovely bi-lingual people make to translate these things for those of us who only speak English.
Back to top Go down
Never Trust A Junkie
First Cut
First Cut
avatar

Posts : 7
Join date : 2013-08-04

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   14.10.13 8:23

http://www.microsofttranslator.com/bv.aspx?from=&to=en&a=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tinnitusattacks.com%2F2013%2F10%2Ffur-mich-ist-musik-erlosung-dave-hause.html You can try this? I just found it. Don't know how accurate it is.

Gah. It doesn't make sense still.
"Dave is home to one of the interlocutors, who discover a new leave, why to do it."

Why did this make me laugh:
"Why has she released you as a solo record?"

Like I pictured a woman releasing him into the wind as a solo record. Like some sort of musician shape-shifter.
I watch True Blood too much.
Back to top Go down
StitchesOnTheRadio
Fighting Back
Fighting Back
avatar

Posts : 177
Join date : 2013-08-03
Age : 26
Location : New York, NY

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   15.10.13 6:00

Never Trust A Junkie wrote:
http://www.microsofttranslator.com/bv.aspx?from=&to=en&a=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tinnitusattacks.com%2F2013%2F10%2Ffur-mich-ist-musik-erlosung-dave-hause.html You can try this? I just found it. Don't know how accurate it is.

Gah. It doesn't make sense still.
"Dave is home to one of the interlocutors, who discover a new leave, why to do it."

Why did this make me laugh:
"Why has she released you as a solo record?"

Like I pictured a woman releasing him into the wind as a solo record. Like some sort of musician shape-shifter.
I watch True Blood too much.
That line made me laugh too! I've tried those translating sites before. Usually it helps if you know a little about grammar in the language your translating because then you know how to re-order the words. I can do that with Spanish, but not so much with other languages. And then theirs sentences that come out like those! haha
Back to top Go down
enola
Vampire Squid
Vampire Squid
avatar

Posts : 427
Join date : 2013-07-31
Location : Vienna, Austria

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   15.10.13 11:39

Unfortunately our computer broke down and typing the whole article will be a nightmare on the iPad. I promise to translate it as soon as we get the computer back  :-)

And I checked with the author of the article and there is he typed it already in German so there is no English version available ...

________________________
Manuela
twitter / instagram / youtube / last.fm / record collection

Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.
Soren Kierkegaard
Back to top Go down
enola
Vampire Squid
Vampire Squid
avatar

Posts : 427
Join date : 2013-07-31
Location : Vienna, Austria

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   28.10.13 9:44

http://www.glassantelope.com/

Billions of people long for the American Dream and peruse devouring as much of it as they can. Philadelphia’s Dave Hause is no exception but has turned his dream of a music career into a hard-working reality. Playing in multiple bands since the mid 1990’s Dave has formed a sound that is truly his own. His latest Rise Records release DEVOUR tells the tale of the American appetite and features an all-star lineup. Below are Dave’s 5

G/A: You have said the new record DEVOUR is about that inherent American appetite. Is this a record for the millions of people who work their fingers to the bone, grasping at a piece of the American Dream? Please expand on the American appetite.

DH: I hope people who do hear the record that are in that position find something to relate to in the lyrics. It’s intended to be written for and about people my age, my generation in general.

The American appetite is hard-wired into us, and you could say it’s just a magnified version of all base human appetites. I think from manifest destiny through Tony Soprano and Walter White, you can find this intense hunger in American culture, one that often throws human relationships out of balance.

G/A: DEVOUR has an all-star lineup of musicians serving as the backing band. Tell us who is on the record and what it was like working with such an amazing group of people?

DH: They were incredible to work with. I had put so much pressure on myself with the writing, and a lot of it, while cathartic, was lonesome and often brutal. Recording with that group of people, in that setting, was a total joy. They played amazingly, contributed generously, and worked their asses of, and it sonically and thematically made Devour what it is. I’m eternally grateful.

G/A: You’re embarking on a 176 day tour to support DEVOUR on Oct 12th. The songs on DEVOUR are rich with memories of growing up in a blue collared neighborhood. It’s clear to see that the blue collared neighborhoods of PA instilled a solid work ethic that you have carried with you all over the world. What place have you visited that has had the most impact on you and why?

DH: Wow, is it that many shows?! That’s a lot of work! The sum total of the experience of traveling is where the impact lies. So many of my friends haven’t even been off of the east coast, let alone all over the world. Traveling really helps to establish a larger framework, a wider lens to view the world through. It’s my privilege and duty to work hard at this job, most people don’t get the opportunity to do this.

G/A: Life on the road has its ups, downs, and interesting moments in between. I’m sure you have enough stories to write a few books. Please share one of your most interesting tales from the road.

DH: There are so many. I have gotten to do so many amazing things and so many fun and wild adventures have transpired. I recently got a guide tour of the Howard Stern Show via a fan of mine, and was able to bring my best bud for over 20 years with me. It’s just one highlight in a pretty incredible life, but it was a fun day.

G/A: If you could only play one last show… Where would it be and what musicians would be on stage with you (musicians can be dead or alive)?

DH: I have no idea man. If it was my last one I’d want to play with my friends so that it was comfortable and memorable. Too many of them to list, but it would be a rocked up version of the revival tour, I’d guess. And Joe Strummer would be there.

________________________
Manuela
twitter / instagram / youtube / last.fm / record collection

Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.
Soren Kierkegaard
Back to top Go down
These Melodies
Fighting Back
Fighting Back


Posts : 267
Join date : 2013-08-03
Age : 34
Location : Bonn, Germany

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   30.10.13 21:38

Alternative Press just shared a new vidoe about "recording Devou" (is this the right thread for it?):


I love that he mentions "The Colour and the Shape" Smile<3

And here's the AP Link:
http://www.altpress.com/aptv/video/studio_video_premiere_dave_hause_on_recording_devour


Last edited by These Melodies on 30.10.13 22:34; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
Susan
Vampire Squid
Vampire Squid
avatar

Posts : 1062
Join date : 2013-08-01
Location : Hamburg, Germany

PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   30.10.13 22:18

Thanks Kerstin!

________________________
I'm gonna chase the mermaid and let her take me to the deep
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Devour - Background   

Back to top Go down
 
Devour - Background
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Crown Lynn Swans - background
» HELP!!! Dye from Batik ran into background
» pokemon background
» Yearbook: background image poll round 1 thread 3
» Yearbook: background image poll round 1 thread 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
RankersAndRotters.com :: The Music :: General Discussion-
Jump to: